History

History is the study of past human experiences. Only by learning about that past can we come to know the fullness of humankind's ideas and actions, tragedies, and triumphs. But, while we learn of the past, we are also learning about the present. The History department at WWCC provides courses to meet general education needs in the first two years in American history and World history. In addition to these introductory courses specialty courses are offered in a number of different areas. These courses have no academic prerequisites and are open to all interested persons.

Courses

  • HIST 105 Roots of World Issues
    This course provides an in-depth examination of some of the origins of the world's most pressing issues. It examines a representative and carefully selected sample of world issues from a global perspective. Issues are selected for relevance, their global priority, and how well they reflect the following categories of issues: environmental, economic, social, cultural, and geopolitical. Recommended: READ 088.
  • HIST 120 American Presidency
    A historical and analytical examination of the Executive Branch of the United States government. Primary areas of emphasis include: leadership styles of each President, evolutionary changes in the power of the office, and the consequences of each on the country. Recommended: READ 088 or higher. Student may not earn credit for both HIST 120 and POLS 120.
  • HIST 205 American Environmental History
    Explores the natural environment and its role throughout American history with special emphasis upon the ways in which different cultural groups have perceived, used, and managed America's natural environment from pre-colonial America to the present. Examines changing attitudes and behaviors toward nature with specific attention to conservation and preservation and the consciousness that has contributed to the American environmental movement. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • HIST 211 U.S. in World Affairs I
    Examination of American involvement in international affairs. Study includes this country's foreign policy actions as a world power, with special attention given to both the policy makers and critics of our nation's position on significant international issues from the colonial period to the beginning of the 20th Century. Recommended: READ 088 or higher. Student may not earn credit for both HIST 211 and POLS 211.
  • HIST 212 U.S. in World Affairs II
    Examination of American involvement in international affairs since 1898. Study includes this country's foreign policy actions as a world power, with special attention given to both the policy makers and critics of our nation's position on significant international issues from the Spanish-American War to the present. Recommended: READ 088 or higher. Student may not earn credit for both HIST 212 and POLS 212.
  • HIST 250 Introduction to Latin America
    Provides an introduction to Latin America with special emphasis on pre-European, colonial, national and international developments that have shaped the region's character from 1500 to the present. Course taken prior to fall 2010 also accepted for diversity requirement. Formerly HIST 280. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • HIST 299 Special Projects in History
    Self-paced course that allows students the opportunity to study/research a specialized area of history under the supervision of a history instructor. Pre-requisites: One prior college-level history course and instructor permission.
  • HIST& 126 World Civilization I
    Introduction to world history from a global perspective, spanning the origins of civilization through the classical world of Greece and Rome. Specifically addresses the evolving character of civilization as well as humankind's search for meaning in the face of historic change. Recommended: READ 088.
  • HIST& 127 World Civilization II
    Introduction to world history from a global perspective, spanning the 5th-century Byzantine Empire to Europe's late 18th century "Age of Revolution." HIST& 127 specifically tracks the evolution of global societies into nations, a critical step in the formation of the political character of the modern world. Recommended: READ 088.
  • HIST& 128 World Civilization III
    Introduction to the history of world cultures from a global perspective, covering the last two centuries of world history, from roughly 1800 to present. Course content highlights the relationship between the "core" of developed, industrialized countries and their evolving relationship with the undeveloped regions of the global "periphery." Recommended: READ 088.
  • HIST& 146 US History I
    Survey of the significant individuals and events that have shaped the growth and development of the United States. Particular attention will be given to the political, economic, religious, and cultural foundations of this development. This course covers the time period from the early Native American societies to the 1830s. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • HIST& 147 U.S. History II
    Survey of the significant individuals and events that have shaped the growth and development of the United States. Particular attention will be given to the political, economic, religious, and cultural foundations of this development. This course focuses on the period from the 1830s to World War I. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • HIST& 148 US History III
    Survey of the significant individuals, groups, and events that have shaped the growth and development of the United States from 1900 to the present. Particular attention will be given to the political, economic, religious, and cultural foundations of this development. Recommended: READ 088 or higher. III.
  • HIST& 214 Pacific NW History
    Survey of the growth and development of the Pacific Northwest Region from the early Native American societies to the present. The class focuses on the cultural, economic, political, and religious development of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho from jointly occupied territories to statehood. Special emphasis will be given to the consequences of contact between European/American groups and the indigenous Native societies. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • HIST& 215 Women in US History
    Survey of the significant contributions (social/moral/legal/political/economic/religious) of women to the growth and development of the United States from the early Native American societies to the present. Student may not earn credit for both HIST& 215 and GWST 215. Course taken prior to fall 2010 also accepted for diversity requirement. Formerly HIST 280, Women in US History. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.

Courses

Courses

  • HIST 105 Roots of World Issues
    This course provides an in-depth examination of some of the origins of the world's most pressing issues. It examines a representative and carefully selected sample of world issues from a global perspective. Issues are selected for relevance, their global priority, and how well they reflect the following categories of issues: environmental, economic, social, cultural, and geopolitical. Recommended: READ 088.
  • HIST 120 American Presidency
    A historical and analytical examination of the Executive Branch of the United States government. Primary areas of emphasis include: leadership styles of each President, evolutionary changes in the power of the office, and the consequences of each on the country. Recommended: READ 088 or higher. Student may not earn credit for both HIST 120 and POLS 120.
  • HIST 205 American Environmental History
    Explores the natural environment and its role throughout American history with special emphasis upon the ways in which different cultural groups have perceived, used, and managed America's natural environment from pre-colonial America to the present. Examines changing attitudes and behaviors toward nature with specific attention to conservation and preservation and the consciousness that has contributed to the American environmental movement. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • HIST 211 U.S. in World Affairs I
    Examination of American involvement in international affairs. Study includes this country's foreign policy actions as a world power, with special attention given to both the policy makers and critics of our nation's position on significant international issues from the colonial period to the beginning of the 20th Century. Recommended: READ 088 or higher. Student may not earn credit for both HIST 211 and POLS 211.
  • HIST 212 U.S. in World Affairs II
    Examination of American involvement in international affairs since 1898. Study includes this country's foreign policy actions as a world power, with special attention given to both the policy makers and critics of our nation's position on significant international issues from the Spanish-American War to the present. Recommended: READ 088 or higher. Student may not earn credit for both HIST 212 and POLS 212.
  • HIST 250 Introduction to Latin America
    Provides an introduction to Latin America with special emphasis on pre-European, colonial, national and international developments that have shaped the region's character from 1500 to the present. Course taken prior to fall 2010 also accepted for diversity requirement. Formerly HIST 280. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • HIST 299 Special Projects in History
    Self-paced course that allows students the opportunity to study/research a specialized area of history under the supervision of a history instructor. Pre-requisites: One prior college-level history course and instructor permission.
  • HIST& 126 World Civilization I
    Introduction to world history from a global perspective, spanning the origins of civilization through the classical world of Greece and Rome. Specifically addresses the evolving character of civilization as well as humankind's search for meaning in the face of historic change. Recommended: READ 088.
  • HIST& 127 World Civilization II
    Introduction to world history from a global perspective, spanning the 5th-century Byzantine Empire to Europe's late 18th century "Age of Revolution." HIST& 127 specifically tracks the evolution of global societies into nations, a critical step in the formation of the political character of the modern world. Recommended: READ 088.
  • HIST& 128 World Civilization III
    Introduction to the history of world cultures from a global perspective, covering the last two centuries of world history, from roughly 1800 to present. Course content highlights the relationship between the "core" of developed, industrialized countries and their evolving relationship with the undeveloped regions of the global "periphery." Recommended: READ 088.
  • HIST& 146 US History I
    Survey of the significant individuals and events that have shaped the growth and development of the United States. Particular attention will be given to the political, economic, religious, and cultural foundations of this development. This course covers the time period from the early Native American societies to the 1830s. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • HIST& 147 U.S. History II
    Survey of the significant individuals and events that have shaped the growth and development of the United States. Particular attention will be given to the political, economic, religious, and cultural foundations of this development. This course focuses on the period from the 1830s to World War I. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • HIST& 148 US History III
    Survey of the significant individuals, groups, and events that have shaped the growth and development of the United States from 1900 to the present. Particular attention will be given to the political, economic, religious, and cultural foundations of this development. Recommended: READ 088 or higher. III.
  • HIST& 214 Pacific NW History
    Survey of the growth and development of the Pacific Northwest Region from the early Native American societies to the present. The class focuses on the cultural, economic, political, and religious development of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho from jointly occupied territories to statehood. Special emphasis will be given to the consequences of contact between European/American groups and the indigenous Native societies. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • HIST& 215 Women in US History
    Survey of the significant contributions (social/moral/legal/political/economic/religious) of women to the growth and development of the United States from the early Native American societies to the present. Student may not earn credit for both HIST& 215 and GWST 215. Course taken prior to fall 2010 also accepted for diversity requirement. Formerly HIST 280, Women in US History. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.