Criminal Justice

The Criminal Justice department provides the theoretical and methodological roots of contemporary criminology inquiry as well as applied course work in Criminal Justice. This department is designed to provide an academic foundation in particular specializations for career advancement and/or transfer to baccalaureate institutions.

Degrees

  • Bachelor of Applied Science in Business Management - Criminal Justice Administration Concentration
    Whether beginning your education or advancing your career, our strategically crafted program sharpens your skills and fast-tracks your career making you applicable for competitive promotions and pay increases so you can achieve your professional aspirations at any stage in your career.Our highly specialized instruction and state-of-the-art technologies teach real life de-escalation and tactical scenarios that deliver knowledge specific for your success, supplying the most desirable skills that will jumpstart your career. With a student-centered focus and interactive learning, this innovative program guides students through practical work experiences that enriches resumes and builds important social networks imperative for the most sought-after careers.
  • Associate of Applied Science Degree in Criminal Justice
    This degree is intended to prepare students for employment in the Criminal Justice field. While the general education components in this degree will transfer to baccalaureate institutions, additional classes will be required (see AAS-T) at baccalaureate institutions. This program does not require background checks or drug screening before entering into the program. However, prospective students should realize that student practicums, and volunteer positions may require background checks and/or drug screens by federal or state law. For more information, visit www.privacyrights.org.
  • Associate of Applied Science-Transfer - Criminal Justice
    This is a dual-purpose degree intended to prepare students for employment in the Criminal Justice field, and for transfer to baccalaureate institutions. Articulation agreements with specific transfer institutions will be announced soon. This program does not require background checks or drug screening before entering into the program. However, prospective students should realize that student practicums, and volunteer positions may require background checks and/or drug screens by federal or state law. For more information, visit www.privacyrights.org.

Courses

  • CJ 102 Applied Skills in Criminal Justice
    This course presents a practical approach to the fundamental organization of the criminal justice system with particular emphasis on job skills, academic proficiency, practical writing, and communication. This course investigates past and present facets of the criminal justice system (law enforcement, courts, and corrections), emphasizing their procedures and complex interrelationships. The aim of this course is to provide students with applied knowledge and practical necessary for successful employment in the field of criminal justice. Recommended: READ 088.
  • CJ 104 Introduction to Policing
    This course examines the role of policing in modern society with specific emphasis on theory and practice. Police structure, culture, basic procedures and operations are evaluated, as well as the significance of discretion, ethics, biases, and philosophies in contemporary policing. This course identifies challenges in law enforcement, including the political, social, organizational and legal environments in which the police perform their roles. Recommended: READ 088.
  • CJ 204 Constitutional Law
    Study of the Constitution of the United States and its provisions and amendments. Topics include various decisions of the Court involving constitutional application of due process relating to arrests, searches, seizures, confessions, and prisoner rights. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • CJ 302 Criminal Procedure
    This course centers on the enforcement and limitations of substantive criminal law through an intensive analysis of law enforcement, criminal investigation, and prosecution as presented in the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution. Laws of search and seizure, self-incrimination, identification procedures, and the right to counsel as defined by the U.S. Supreme Court are examined, highlighting specific areas of distinction between the U.S. Supreme Court and Washington State Law including how amendments, rules, statutes, and case law continue to evolve over time with specific emphasis on issues that arise during criminal investigation and prosecution. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ 303 Legal Research
    This course provides an introduction to legal research and writing with emphasis on the identification and analysis of legal problems utilizing primary and secondary resources. Students are expected to compose a variety of written forms that adhere to the conventions of the legal profession. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ 304 Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Criminal Justice
    This course explores how racial, ethnic, and gender interplay in the criminal justice system with special focus on how biases and stereotypes stemming from political rhetoric and media influence normative concepts of justice and equity in the criminal “justice” process. Fundamental consequences of racism, legally sanctioned segregation, discrimination, racial profiling, hate crimes, jury nullification, prosecution, and incarceration are analyzed with detail given to the application of existing law and the need for restructure to necessitate social justice. Implicit bias, racial disparities of arrest rates, conviction, and sentencing are also discussed. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ 426 Victimology
    This course is an examination of victims in the Criminal Justice system across modern and historical context with focus on interactions, treatment, roles, and the various types of harm victims incur. Victimology theory and research that detail victims’ characteristics, victimization rates and patterns in relation to socially distinctive categories are used in order to provide appropriate identification and response. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ 427 Crisis Response & De-Escalation Tactics
    This course is designed for students to learn and apply practical skills and theoretical concepts about the complexities of de-escalation, conflict resolution, and mental health. Students will be expected to participate in various, practical high-pressure scenarios that span the field of criminal justice, subsequently, incorporating techniques designed to improve social interaction and conflict transformation. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ 495 Criminal Justice Capstone
    This course is an opportunity for students to gain an emic perspective of the criminal justice system with a structured, extended, off-campus internship. Students are expected to synthesize acquired knowledge obtained from the BAS Administration in Criminal Justice program and demonstrate critical thinking and decision-making skills. Students are responsible for obtaining an internship position with instructor approval. Taken in the final year. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ& 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
    This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, including law enforcement, the courts, corrections, juvenile justice, and current issues. This course examines the Constitutional requirement, historical developments, different agencies, processes and theories of the criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed on how the various systems interrelate and interact with each other to attain the goal of an equitable delivery crime-related public service. Recommended: READ 088. Formerly CJ 101.
  • CJ& 105 Introduction to Corrections
    Review of the corrections field, tracing early American penal systems and philosophy to present day correctional programs. Emphasis on our contemporary penal system, incarceration, classification, various forms of release, and community-based correctional programs. Formerly CJ 105. Recommended: READ 088.
  • CJ& 106 Juvenile Justice
    This course will cover the history and philosophy of juvenile justice in America and the impact of societal reforms on the juvenile justice system. Multiple theories of delinquency will be discussed, as well as how society's response to criminal behavior influenced the development, construction, and implementation of juvenile justice laws, policies, and programs. Recommended: READ 088.
  • CJ& 110 Criminal Law
    This course is an introduction to the study of criminal law in the United States and will review the difference between crimes against property, crimes against public, and crimes against a person. This course will study the various mental states required for criminal responsibility and defenses used in a criminal trial, along with definitions, classifications, elements, and penalties of crime and criminal responsibility. Formerly CJ 103, Intro to Criminal Law. Recommended: READ 088.
  • CJ& 112 Criminology
    Criminology is the scientific study of crime, criminal behavior, and the law. This course covers crime theories, typologies, patterns, correlates, and statistics, as well as the public's perceptions and relations to criminal behavior. Recommended: READ 088. Formerly CJ 106, Criminology.
  • CJ& 240 Forensic Science
    Survey of fundamental techniques as they apply to specific criminal investigations. Examines the basic principles of the law of criminal evidence with emphasis on the role of the investigator in collecting, preserving, and introducing evidence in court. Formerly CJ 205. Recommended: READ 088.

Degrees

Degrees

  • Bachelor of Applied Science in Business Management - Criminal Justice Administration Concentration
    Whether beginning your education or advancing your career, our strategically crafted program sharpens your skills and fast-tracks your career making you applicable for competitive promotions and pay increases so you can achieve your professional aspirations at any stage in your career.Our highly specialized instruction and state-of-the-art technologies teach real life de-escalation and tactical scenarios that deliver knowledge specific for your success, supplying the most desirable skills that will jumpstart your career. With a student-centered focus and interactive learning, this innovative program guides students through practical work experiences that enriches resumes and builds important social networks imperative for the most sought-after careers.
  • Associate of Applied Science Degree in Criminal Justice
    This degree is intended to prepare students for employment in the Criminal Justice field. While the general education components in this degree will transfer to baccalaureate institutions, additional classes will be required (see AAS-T) at baccalaureate institutions. This program does not require background checks or drug screening before entering into the program. However, prospective students should realize that student practicums, and volunteer positions may require background checks and/or drug screens by federal or state law. For more information, visit www.privacyrights.org.
  • Associate of Applied Science-Transfer - Criminal Justice
    This is a dual-purpose degree intended to prepare students for employment in the Criminal Justice field, and for transfer to baccalaureate institutions. Articulation agreements with specific transfer institutions will be announced soon. This program does not require background checks or drug screening before entering into the program. However, prospective students should realize that student practicums, and volunteer positions may require background checks and/or drug screens by federal or state law. For more information, visit www.privacyrights.org.

Courses

Courses

  • CJ 102 Applied Skills in Criminal Justice
    This course presents a practical approach to the fundamental organization of the criminal justice system with particular emphasis on job skills, academic proficiency, practical writing, and communication. This course investigates past and present facets of the criminal justice system (law enforcement, courts, and corrections), emphasizing their procedures and complex interrelationships. The aim of this course is to provide students with applied knowledge and practical necessary for successful employment in the field of criminal justice. Recommended: READ 088.
  • CJ 104 Introduction to Policing
    This course examines the role of policing in modern society with specific emphasis on theory and practice. Police structure, culture, basic procedures and operations are evaluated, as well as the significance of discretion, ethics, biases, and philosophies in contemporary policing. This course identifies challenges in law enforcement, including the political, social, organizational and legal environments in which the police perform their roles. Recommended: READ 088.
  • CJ 204 Constitutional Law
    Study of the Constitution of the United States and its provisions and amendments. Topics include various decisions of the Court involving constitutional application of due process relating to arrests, searches, seizures, confessions, and prisoner rights. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.
  • CJ 302 Criminal Procedure
    This course centers on the enforcement and limitations of substantive criminal law through an intensive analysis of law enforcement, criminal investigation, and prosecution as presented in the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution. Laws of search and seizure, self-incrimination, identification procedures, and the right to counsel as defined by the U.S. Supreme Court are examined, highlighting specific areas of distinction between the U.S. Supreme Court and Washington State Law including how amendments, rules, statutes, and case law continue to evolve over time with specific emphasis on issues that arise during criminal investigation and prosecution. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ 303 Legal Research
    This course provides an introduction to legal research and writing with emphasis on the identification and analysis of legal problems utilizing primary and secondary resources. Students are expected to compose a variety of written forms that adhere to the conventions of the legal profession. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ 304 Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Criminal Justice
    This course explores how racial, ethnic, and gender interplay in the criminal justice system with special focus on how biases and stereotypes stemming from political rhetoric and media influence normative concepts of justice and equity in the criminal “justice” process. Fundamental consequences of racism, legally sanctioned segregation, discrimination, racial profiling, hate crimes, jury nullification, prosecution, and incarceration are analyzed with detail given to the application of existing law and the need for restructure to necessitate social justice. Implicit bias, racial disparities of arrest rates, conviction, and sentencing are also discussed. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ 426 Victimology
    This course is an examination of victims in the Criminal Justice system across modern and historical context with focus on interactions, treatment, roles, and the various types of harm victims incur. Victimology theory and research that detail victims’ characteristics, victimization rates and patterns in relation to socially distinctive categories are used in order to provide appropriate identification and response. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ 427 Crisis Response & De-Escalation Tactics
    This course is designed for students to learn and apply practical skills and theoretical concepts about the complexities of de-escalation, conflict resolution, and mental health. Students will be expected to participate in various, practical high-pressure scenarios that span the field of criminal justice, subsequently, incorporating techniques designed to improve social interaction and conflict transformation. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ 495 Criminal Justice Capstone
    This course is an opportunity for students to gain an emic perspective of the criminal justice system with a structured, extended, off-campus internship. Students are expected to synthesize acquired knowledge obtained from the BAS Administration in Criminal Justice program and demonstrate critical thinking and decision-making skills. Students are responsible for obtaining an internship position with instructor approval. Taken in the final year. This course is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science Program. Permission Code from Criminal Justice Lead is required.
  • CJ& 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
    This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, including law enforcement, the courts, corrections, juvenile justice, and current issues. This course examines the Constitutional requirement, historical developments, different agencies, processes and theories of the criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed on how the various systems interrelate and interact with each other to attain the goal of an equitable delivery crime-related public service. Recommended: READ 088. Formerly CJ 101.
  • CJ& 105 Introduction to Corrections
    Review of the corrections field, tracing early American penal systems and philosophy to present day correctional programs. Emphasis on our contemporary penal system, incarceration, classification, various forms of release, and community-based correctional programs. Formerly CJ 105. Recommended: READ 088.
  • CJ& 106 Juvenile Justice
    This course will cover the history and philosophy of juvenile justice in America and the impact of societal reforms on the juvenile justice system. Multiple theories of delinquency will be discussed, as well as how society's response to criminal behavior influenced the development, construction, and implementation of juvenile justice laws, policies, and programs. Recommended: READ 088.
  • CJ& 110 Criminal Law
    This course is an introduction to the study of criminal law in the United States and will review the difference between crimes against property, crimes against public, and crimes against a person. This course will study the various mental states required for criminal responsibility and defenses used in a criminal trial, along with definitions, classifications, elements, and penalties of crime and criminal responsibility. Formerly CJ 103, Intro to Criminal Law. Recommended: READ 088.
  • CJ& 112 Criminology
    Criminology is the scientific study of crime, criminal behavior, and the law. This course covers crime theories, typologies, patterns, correlates, and statistics, as well as the public's perceptions and relations to criminal behavior. Recommended: READ 088. Formerly CJ 106, Criminology.
  • CJ& 240 Forensic Science
    Survey of fundamental techniques as they apply to specific criminal investigations. Examines the basic principles of the law of criminal evidence with emphasis on the role of the investigator in collecting, preserving, and introducing evidence in court. Formerly CJ 205. Recommended: READ 088.

Academic Credit for Prior Learning